NEWS

So, we have actual, honest-to-god first-gen smartlinks now.

  • 13 Replies
  • 1790 Views

Frostbyte

  • *
  • Newb
  • *
  • Posts: 50
  • Good news, everyone!

Necrogigas

  • *
  • Ace Runner
  • ****
  • Posts: 1477
« Reply #1 on: (05:09:03/01-27-13) »
Whenever I see stuff like this that's straight out of sci-fi, I always think; If this is the technology known about by members of the general population, then what's military tech like right now?
"Speech" *Thought* <Matrix> ~Astral~

Characters

AJCarrington

  • *
  • Global Moderator
  • Prime Runner
  • *****
  • Posts: 3131
« Reply #2 on: (09:24:41/01-27-13) »
Excellent point!

Longshot23

  • *
  • Omae
  • ***
  • Posts: 937
« Reply #3 on: (09:34:49/01-27-13) »
I was once told, or read somewhere, that military tech is about 12 years ahead of publicly/commercially available tech.

Mad Hamish

  • *
  • Chummer
  • **
  • Posts: 162
« Reply #4 on: (09:49:34/01-27-13) »
Dunno, the military doesn't seem to have been anything like this in the field.
They might also be a bit dubious about how well  it will survive out in the field and also how long it is actually usable for

RHat

  • *
  • Prime Runner
  • *****
  • Posts: 6317
« Reply #5 on: (20:57:28/01-27-13) »
It's entirely possible, seeing as this IS Linux based, that this was just the personal project of some programmer who likes to hunt.

Military tech is well ahead if and only if they're able to take the lead on and control the advancement in that area.
"Speech"
Thoughts
Matrix <<Text>> "Speech"
Spirits and Sprites

Necrogigas

  • *
  • Ace Runner
  • ****
  • Posts: 1477
« Reply #6 on: (01:20:44/01-28-13) »
I was once told, or read somewhere, that military tech is about 12 years ahead of publicly/commercially available tech.
Sounds about right, the U.S. military used GPS in the Gulf War, and about 10 - 15 years later GPS devices became popular in the consumer sector.
« Last Edit: (01:27:39/01-28-13) by Necrogigas »
"Speech" *Thought* <Matrix> ~Astral~

Characters

RHat

  • *
  • Prime Runner
  • *****
  • Posts: 6317
« Reply #7 on: (01:26:12/01-28-13) »
I was once told, or read somewhere, that military tech is about 12 years ahead of publicly/commercially available tech.
Sounds about right, the U,S, military used GPS in the Gulf War, and about 10 - 15 years later GPS devices became popular in the consumer sector.
Which, as I recall, was a DARPA development.
"Speech"
Thoughts
Matrix <<Text>> "Speech"
Spirits and Sprites

Mournclaw

  • *
  • Chummer
  • **
  • Posts: 108
  • The trees have eyes... And so do I!
« Reply #8 on: (02:20:05/01-28-13) »
Well, guys, you know we've had the tecnhology to do this kind of thing well since 90's... It's just that no-one's really had the imagination and moth interest and funding to bring it into reality. Except for some hardcore nerds. Initiate a good enough browse program (as in google, youtube or whatever, depending on your data search and information processing skills)... parameters... search area: internet, subject: wearable computer smartlink software. Or just "wearable computer". This'll blow your mind.

Smileinbob

  • *
  • Newb
  • *
  • Posts: 69
« Reply #9 on: (22:01:17/01-28-13) »
It kinda reminded me of the XM-29 SABR OICW (Objective Individual Combat Weapon). Back in the late 90's when I was in the marines, the marine corps times had a write up on these new wonder rifles that we would be getting in the near future. Although it never happened and the project was scrapped, it was a neat idea. It was basically a shortened m4 carbine with a 20mm grenade launcher on top of that and a video based sight/scope on top of that. The weapon platform was supposed to operate in several set ups with and without any one of the parts.  I don't know fully why it was dropped although I would imagine it wouldn't fair to well in real world testing. (We put those weapons through some hell when out in the field).

CanRay

  • *
  • Freelancer
  • Mr. Johnson
  • ***
  • Posts: 11028
  • Spouter of Random Words
    • CanRay's Artistic Work
« Reply #10 on: (22:26:25/01-28-13) »
A lot of XM family of weapons have been dropped.  Essentially the M16/M4 family is too numerous and there's too many parts in storage to try and replace it, even if it is long in the tooth.  Or, that's the explanation I've heard the most.  Book learning, however.

The XM-8 showed a lot of promise!
Si vis pacem, para bellum

AndyNakamura

  • *
  • Chummer
  • **
  • Posts: 214
  • Memetic Warfare Agent
« Reply #11 on: (00:23:21/01-29-13) »
The almighty Wiki gives the reason as insufficient cost efficiency of the upgrade: the advantages over the M16 were not significant enough to warrant the expenditure of re-arming the whole US military.
"If you are expecting a rousing speech, or a cunning plan that will get us out of this, I will have to disappoint you. I don't have any. We either do this, or we die. And the world dies with us."
"I paid quite a lot to get all of you here. I expect you to give me my money's worth. Shogun out."

Redmercury

  • *
  • Omae
  • ***
  • Posts: 251
« Reply #12 on: (00:32:04/01-29-13) »
It's probable that the military (I'll assume we're talking about the US) decided that implementing something like this in drone technology, perhaps even mechanized stationary gun mounts (yes, still a drone, I'm illustrating potential uses), was more worthwhile than putting on the top of a rifle. It also seems a little sensitive for the rank and file anyway. Reliability is a big factor.

CanRay

  • *
  • Freelancer
  • Mr. Johnson
  • ***
  • Posts: 11028
  • Spouter of Random Words
    • CanRay's Artistic Work
« Reply #13 on: (14:07:07/01-29-13) »
How to test the durability of something:  Give it to a green private in a combat zone.
Si vis pacem, para bellum