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6E car transport

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hulka

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« Reply #15 on: <09-01-20/0726:59> »
The question therefore remains whether the Grid Guide is connected to wireless in the car or not.
If the GG is independent and guides the car without the need to connect to wifi, then I can turn off wifi at any time without penalty.
However, if the GG is connected via wifi, then turning it off threatens traffic and cannot be turned off while driving.
If anyone turns off the wifi while driving, then it leads to the automatic stop of the vehicle, the car is taken over by the Pilot and he guides him to a safe stop.
Or the car continues in its original direction until it hits something.
IMHO Police cars are controlled by law and as such must be identifiable and cannot turn off wifi. Their protection is provided by the Host.

Michael Chandra

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« Reply #16 on: <09-01-20/0821:54> »
Given how GridGuide can't use road-wires everywhere and needs to connect with all the cars, I'd say that GridGuide won't function without wireless. But your car still has an autopilot without GridGuide.
How am I not part of the forum?? O_O I am both active and angry!

hulka

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« Reply #17 on: <09-01-20/0902:47> »
That's exactly my opinion.
However, if Autopilot loses connection and does not know the exact conditions of traffic, then its primary directive is to stop the car safely.
And for another, if so, then turning off wifi may not be possible while driving.
The car's safety protocol should not allow this.

Hobbes

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« Reply #18 on: <09-01-20/0950:19> »
GG isn't Omnipresent, Drone and Vehicle Autopilot work without GG just fine.  They certainly work better with something like Grid Guide coordinating all the other traffic though. 

Pilot Programs also function just fine without Wireless.  Giving a flying drone orders without Wireless presents some challenges ; )   But you can certainly plug into your car and give it commands, and the Autopilot will do its best.  Verbal commands or manual input are also options.


Stainless Steel Devil Rat

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« Reply #19 on: <09-01-20/0955:46> »
...Giving a flying drone orders without Wireless presents some challenges ; ) ...

while this is true, if 5e fluff carries over into 6e it's not impossible.  Namely: drones (and vehicles) understand voice commands just fine.  You can literally tell your flying drone what you want it to do, even while you have its wireless capability shut off.  Of course, it'd have to be within voice range for that to work...
RPG mechanics exist to give structure and consistency to the game world, true, but at the end of the day, youíre fighting dragons with algebra and random number generators.

penllawen

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« Reply #20 on: <09-01-20/1011:24> »
I think the best way to think about GridGuide in terms of mechanics is that itís a gigantic RCC in the sky, with all the vehicles within its purview connected to it. It gives them some extra dice via something like a super-autosoft, which lets the autopilots on each vehicle travel faster / closer / safer than it could do otherwise. GridGuide can issue commands to vehicles which are then carried out by the autopilot on the vehicle to the best of its ability.

Michael Chandra

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« Reply #21 on: <09-01-20/1149:13> »
That's exactly my opinion.
However, if Autopilot loses connection and does not know the exact conditions of traffic, then its primary directive is to stop the car safely.
And for another, if so, then turning off wifi may not be possible while driving.
The car's safety protocol should not allow this.
Nah, a car has maps and cameras, so it can still navigate.
How am I not part of the forum?? O_O I am both active and angry!

Xenon

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« Reply #22 on: <09-01-20/1225:36> »
If the GG is independent and guides the car without the need to connect to wifi, then I can turn off wifi at any time without penalty.
A wireless disabled vehicle will not automatically recharge and it's mapsofts will not be automatically updated (you will not know the latest traffic jam situation, know about the accidents that might have impact on traffic, know if the bridge up ahead is about to open or not etc).


If anyone turns off the wifi while driving, then it leads to the automatic stop of the vehicle, the car is taken over by the Pilot and he guides him to a safe stop.
If you are connected to GridLink then the autopilot of the vehicle cannot exceed speed limits and the vehicle can be remotely shut down.

If you are connected to GridLink but run a GridLink Override (or if you turn wireless off) then the autopilot of the vehicle can exceed speed limits and the vehicle cannot be remotely shut down.


Or the car continues in its original direction until it hits something.
No...

That pretty much only happen if nobody is controlling the vehicle and the vehicle's autopilot have been disabled. Or perhaps if the vehicle have been bricked.

A vehicle with an Autopilot that have access to the correct autosofts (in a vehicle that runs GridLink Override) can take all sorts of actions (evasive maneuvers, perform stunts, participate in car chases, firing on-board weapons etc) and unless the vehicle have an active metahuman pilot it will also automatically take over control to make sure you don't crash into stuff.

You can also manually take control over the vehicle. Driving it like people used to drive vehicles back in 2020. You never need a wireless connection for physically driving something yourself. At least in 5th edition, manual control override autopilot.

And you can also control it via AR or VR. Even if it is wireless disabled (via direct connection). At least in 5th edition, this override both autopilot and manual control.

And if the vehicle have a rigger adaption and you have an implanted control rig or is a technomancer with a machine mind echo you can also control while being jumped in. Even if it is wireless disabled (via direct connection). And at least in 5th edition this would override autopilot, manual control as well as regular remote control.


However, if Autopilot loses connection and does not know the exact conditions of traffic, then its primary directive is to stop the car safely.
Where did you read this?

Sensors (such as cameras and range finders) and most vehicle features (such as lane assist, adaptive cruise control and various map softs) and it's own onboard autopilot (and it's locally loaded autosofts) don't suddenly stop working just because the vehicle is not connected via wifi....
« Last Edit: <09-01-20/1228:03> by Xenon »

hulka

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« Reply #23 on: <09-01-20/1523:07> »
Thanks, I had a slightly different idea of how the Grid Guide works.

penllawen

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« Reply #24 on: <09-01-20/1732:00> »
Thanks, I had a slightly different idea of how the Grid Guide works.
Donít worry about it, the canon is pretty thin for this stuff. Itís why it comes up so often!

Sir Ludwig

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« Reply #25 on: <09-01-20/2122:11> »
MC,

Invisible mages running across a busy street.  Guess that is why we have those pictures on lawn mowers that tell you not to stick your fingers into the blades.

Who would be at fault if they are hit?  GG, driver/owner of vech/invisible mage?  Sounds like I got a game idea where the runners are hired to get proof the mages where invisible for (insurance company, GG, driver). To help win the case.

Regards,
SL
Si vis pacem, para bellum

Hobbes

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« Reply #26 on: <09-02-20/0949:44> »
The Mage would be liable for damages from their activities.  Magical or Mundane. 

If you lay out in a crosswalk in your concrete themed ghillie suit the driver that runs you over isn't at fault.

It's like throwing out concealed objects on the road, if they cause damage you're liable.  Even if that object is your own spine.

Sir Ludwig

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« Reply #27 on: <09-02-20/2221:20> »
Hobbes,

I understand that by letter of the law that is how it should work.  I also watch the news each morning and get bombarded by the "have you been hurt on the job" or "Is your employer not paying you fairly"?  Also, I had owned a large industrial building that received roof hail damage.  We even had video's of the hail from security cameras.  Took me 18 months to get them to pay the claim.  That being said, I wondered what would happen on insurance companies when you got people that can cast invisibility. 

Best,
SL
Si vis pacem, para bellum

Stainless Steel Devil Rat

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« Reply #28 on: <09-02-20/2246:07> »
Convincing some deserving beneficiary to drop a lawsuit on behalf of a Mr J working for the insurance company is exactly the kind of job that counts as "Working for the Man".
RPG mechanics exist to give structure and consistency to the game world, true, but at the end of the day, youíre fighting dragons with algebra and random number generators.

Hobbes

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« Reply #29 on: <09-02-20/2310:39> »
Hobbes,

I understand that by letter of the law that is how it should work.  I also watch the news each morning and get bombarded by the "have you been hurt on the job" or "Is your employer not paying you fairly"?  Also, I had owned a large industrial building that received roof hail damage.  We even had video's of the hail from security cameras.  Took me 18 months to get them to pay the claim.  That being said, I wondered what would happen on insurance companies when you got people that can cast invisibility. 

Best,
SL

So, it costs money to litigate, even when you win.  A lot of Insurance companies simply settle to avoid the litigation costs and eliminate the risk of a huge judgement.  So, yes, even when your cause is virtuous and just, some money guy may just write a check 'cause it's not worth the risk/expense to pay the other guy off.

Intent comes into it.  Was there an opportunity to avoid the damage also plays a factor.  At least that is what I was told in the very boring lectures I needed to sit through to get my Series 6 License. 

And yes, Insurance companies don't write out (presumably) 6 (7?  8?) figure checks easily.  The one I briefly worked for resented the three figure checks they had to cough up occasionally for me  ; )