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Modifying Tags and Wireless ID's, etc.

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Gorstavich

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« on: (15:15:00/06-14-18) »
Is it allowed to modify existing RFID tags and wireless access on your cyberware / equipment / gear?

Situation:  I have a character (a Dwarven Detective -ish) that I had sat down and written out every piece of cyber/gear that he possessed which, in my mind, might include a wireless connection and/or tag.  After doing this, I went about modifying everything.

Example:  His arm’s tag identifies itself as a “Standard model B2, Chrome finish, from Pick-Ur-Parts, 'This and That at discount prices!'” instead of what it actually is, and I specifically wrote in that the smuggling compartment could be access by manual release only and wasn’t ‘wired’ into anything (and thus couldn’t be hacked, or even detected, via matrix).  Also did similar with his eyes.

Yes, I was really (REALLY) bored at work one day.  I figured that running with all tags turned off will stand out too much in the 2080's... but modifying a broadcasted tag to show something more innocent would help one blend in more.  With the upcoming Neo-Tokyo push, I thought this might be very important indeed.

Anyway, the GM allowed it at that time (might have been all the laughing he did while reading my commercial tag jingles), but asked that I follow-up on what is and isn’t allowed, RAW.
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Xenon

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« Reply #1 on: (16:35:01/06-14-18) »
You can use the Matrix Action Change Icon to change the appearance of your own Icons to give them a more personalized look. However, icons changed in this manner will not override matrix protocols for icons. A vehicle icon will still have to look like a vehicle icon (but for example your Chrysler-Nissan Jackrabbit could have an icon that make it look like a Mitsubishi Nightsky). Also, this will only work at a glance. If someone actually spend time to look at the icon they will see what it really is (with a successful matrix perception test it is obvious that the icon that might look like a Mitsubishi Nightsky actually is a Chrysler-Nissan Jackrabbit - it is also obvious that the owner changed the default icon).

A decker can run the Wrapper cyberprogram to break matrix protocols for icons when using the Change Icon Matrix Action (for example your Chrysler-Nissan Jackrabbit could have a Toaster Icon even though a Toaster is not a vehicle). However, even in this case this will only work at a glance. If someone actually spend time to look at the icon they will see what it really is (with a successful matrix perception test it is obvious that the icon that might look like a Toaster actually is a Chrysler-Nissan Jackrabbit - it is also obvious that the owner changed the default icon).

An observer trying to spot the device icon of your Chrysler-Nissan Jackrabbit will not be fooled by the fact you used Change Icon to alter the appearance to a Mitsubishi Nightsky or a Toaster.

As long as your Augmentations are connected to your nervous system (pretty much all of them except maybe the ocular drone while it is out flying) they can be controlled via a neural interface (not to be confused with DNI). No need for wireless for this. Reason you turn them wireless on is to gain wireless bonuses or other wireless functionality.
« Last Edit: (16:36:37/06-14-18) by Xenon »

easl

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« Reply #2 on: (21:57:54/06-14-18) »
In RL, a passive RFID tag is either a microchip or simply pattern of metal printed on (or in) something. If you can find it, you can remove it and replace it/alter it. I'd say in most cases that's a hardware test to find and remove; to replace you'd obviously need a replacement chip. To modify you might need some specialized equipment. If your chipped cyberware is *inside* you, I'd say no dice without actual surgery, or unless the person wants to try something like bricking their rfid tag.


I figured that running with all tags turned off will stand out too much in the 2080's...

RFID tags are already in pretty much every piece of clothing you buy as well as a lot of standard item packaging, but nobody notices.  They're used by stores for inventory management and sometimes theft prevention. You have to have a scanner designed to read that chip, know what you're looking for, and care about tracking them to see them.

Now, runners and corp security might be exactly the sort of types who would indeed care enough about such stuff to track it (and notice when someone suspiciously has none). However I would not expect the lack of rfids to be noticed by anyone as you walk down the street; not even your average Lone Star or Knight Errant hired peace keeper.

Of course this is really a setting question, and thus entirely up to your group and GM.  But that's my two bits for what it's worth.

Reaver

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« Reply #3 on: (00:10:03/06-15-18) »
OTOH,

The Corp Spider will definitely wonder why a pair of "Man Panties: For YOUR comfort" are walking through the Corp Research Labs at 2:30am on a Tuesday...






Not to mention the looks some of your team-mates may give you..
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Marcus

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« Reply #4 on: (00:40:57/06-15-18) »
You ever looked at an RFID under a scope? or tried to design one?
Your gonna need some good hardware, and software, a Computer/Software Engineer and Electrical Engineer, and a good antenna design that's before we even discussing getting one made. Yes we now build them in ways that make it easy to just update to meet a companies needs. But they are not dumb piece of metal, and you don't pull a pin laser out and re-write the code on them. They are not simple.

Who knows what advancements have been made in SR but basics still have to be the same.
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Gorstavich

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« Reply #5 on: (11:51:56/06-15-18) »
So several people have chimed in (and thank you for that) on RFID tags, but what about deliberately separating certain functionality from the "wireless" pieces of your hardware.  The original cyberarm example in my first post, for instance?

Or an isolated sensor (something real specific, like a geiger counter for example) that delivers a simple audio/visual alert and simple details (you'd need to plug a cable into it to get more information) so that it has no wireless component, nor would show up if someone "wirelessly scanned" you?

Yes, this is kind of getting silly, but I'm really curious about this.  My actual day job involves working with phone systems, as well as (limited) cellular and wireless networks, and all the possibilities (and vulnerabilities) keep stirring around in the back of my head.
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« Reply #6 on: (12:13:21/06-15-18) »
It's a free action to turn a device's wireless functionality on/off.  So there's no real need to go digging into the electronics.  (SR5 pg 421)

If you're a shadowrunner, you likely already have your underwear, socks, cyberarm, katana, and etc already all turned wireless-off.

Xenon

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« Reply #7 on: (13:18:59/06-15-18) »
The original cyberarm example in my first post, for instance?
As I wrote above, your cyberarm does not have to be wireless enabled since as long as it is connected to your body you can controll it via a neural interface.

SR5 p. 451 Augmentation
Besides their wireless functionality, almost all cyberware devices are equipped with a neural interface (not to be confused with DNI) that lets you mentally activate and control their functions. You can use this in place of wireless control, preventing wireless hacking, as long as all of the “moving parts” are connected to your nervous system. An item that has a wireless bonus, however, can only gain that full level of functionality if wireless functionality is active.


My actual day job involves working with phone systems, as well as (limited) cellular and wireless networks, and all the possibilities (and vulnerabilities) keep stirring around in the back of my head.
Devices in SR5 basically use Blue Tooth, but with unlimited hand-shake distance. By default they are all wireless enabled, but they can all be wireless disabled (either with the Change Linked Device Mode Free Action or the Change Device Mode Simple Action).

easl

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« Reply #8 on: (14:26:55/06-15-18) »
OTOH,

The Corp Spider will definitely wonder why a pair of "Man Panties: For YOUR comfort" are walking through the Corp Research Labs at 2:30am on a Tuesday...

That could just be Bob from marketing, working late. I guarantee you the under-clothing choices of the people in a typical office (let alone a high pressure shadowrun corps!) would surprise you :)

To respond to Marcus; they vary greatly in complexity. As of 2012 I think some groups had starting showing you can simply print them using an inkjet printer and metallic ink. So I mildly disagree with you on the requirements to create one, and your 'not simple' claim. Some are, some aren't. 

But this is a game, not a real world simulation. For both simplicity and to keep the players incentivised, I'd probably treat faked/replaced rfids like a fake sim or fake licence; make the appropriate roll or pay the appropriate price per level, and the level becomes the difficulty of the investigating NPC to notice the fakeness.


Beta

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« Reply #9 on: (15:56:39/06-15-18) »
In my game one of the cottage industries in the barrens is extracting RFID tags for the grey and black markets of replacing tags. 

Grey market would be like, you want to replace the seats in your car (because the old ones got soaked in blood) and you want something more comfortable for your orc butt -- but for some reason you care about only using authorized parts for that car.  You get the seats you want, from wherever, and pay someone for RFID tags scavenged from a wreck of the same type of car as you have.  So by the scan, you have approved Ford America seats in place (albeit not the ones that came with the car originally).

Black market would be you take the RFID from an umbrella and put it in an Uzi (after burning out the original RFID).  You really don't want to get searched when you are doing that, but sometimes ....

Stoneglobe

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« Reply #10 on: (01:14:25/06-16-18) »
Modifying the RFID tags in devices may or may not be within the realms of a player's ability though personally I'm inclined to allow it through hacking the tag (it is by default a wirelessly enabled device set to broadcast the contents of a file at all times), edit file and of course forgery to ensure that the file you've created stands up as being from the real company.

However, even if you don't believe that the above option is possible or right, completely removing/erasing existing tags is perfectly acceptable which is why every shadowrunner I've ever seen created has a Tag Eraser or 10. You can then replace said tag with one of your own set to broadcast whatever you want simply by buying standard RFID tags and stating what you're putting on them. Again I would want a forgery roll to ensure that whatever you were trying to represent was authentic.

To quote William Gibson, which for those who know me here won't come as a huge surprise, "The street finds its own uses for things."
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Xenon

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« Reply #11 on: (03:54:16/06-16-18) »
Why are you guys talking about using electronics and whatnot to change the matrix representation of RFID-tags when talking about your gear...? Most things in SR5 are already wireless enabled and will simply broadcast their own device icon.

SR5 p. 420 Wirelss Functionallity
The few devices that are non-wireless are most likely tagged with RFID tags (p. 440).



If you want to change your Chrysler-Nissan Jackrabbit so it instead look like a Mitsubishi Nightsky you just use the the Change Icon Matrix Action (it is a legal Data Processing action that anyone can use, no need for a hacker for this and it will not cause ripples within the matrix for the overwatch division to converge on). You need to use the looks of an icon you already have a copy of or an icon that you designed yourself. Also, unless you run Wrapper (which is a restricted cyberprogram that you normally can't run on a simple commlink) you still have to obey basic matrix protocols (basically meaning that the icon of a vehicle still have to be a "vehicle" of sorts, but besides that you can go nuts -- for example the official Icon of the Ares Mobmaster riot control vehicle is actually a Roman chariot icon complete with reins to drive the vehicle...)

File Icons located on your RFID-tag (that for example display an ARO) can be changed with the Edit File Matrix Action (but you require a mark on the file before you can do that).

 

SR5 p. 219 Devices
Device icons in the Matrix represent electronic devices in the real world, from your music player to your commlink to your car and beyond. By default, a device’s icon looks like the object it represents, in miniature if the real thing is larger than a person. It has controls of some kind, often the same controls it has in meat space, but not necessarily. The Ares Mobmaster riot control vehicle, for example, is famous for its unorthodox Roman chariot icon complete with reins to drive the vehicle.
Basic Matrix protocols require device icons to provide some hint of their real-life function. A firearm’s icon looks like a weapon (even if that weapon is a tomahawk, like the icon of the Super Warhawk pistol), a vehicle’s icon looks like a vehicle, a lock’s icon looks like a lock, a refrigerator looks like a cold box for food, etc. The restrictions on devices aren’t as stringent as on personas, as long as form suggests function at a glance.


SR5 p. 238 Change Icon
You change the target’s icon to one that you have a copy of or have designed yourself. Changing an icon doesn’t change the results of a Matrix Perception action, but might fool personas who don’t take the time to inspect your new look. You can target your own icon, if you like.

SR5 p. 222 Life with a Commlink
You can choose which of your AROs are seen by which people, so you can keep it private or, if you’re feeling impish, put vulgar AROs on RFID tags and scatter them around town for all to see....
Most of what you keep on your commlink are files, this includes music, your SIN (fake or otherwise), licenses (also fake or otherwise), maps, email messages, your contact book, AROs, and so on.


SR5 p. 215 Matrix Jargon
geo-tagging: Assigning AROs to a specific physical location, often using RFID tags.

SR5 p. 239 Edit File
Edit File allows you to create, change, copy, delete, or protect any kind of file.