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katana: two handed?

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Elektrycerze3

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« Reply #75 on: (06:20:39/04-30-13) »
or using GMV...  Common Sense (I guess) ;)

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bannockburn

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« Reply #76 on: (06:23:57/04-30-13) »
Gesunder MenschenVerstand. German for common sense, literal translation: healthy human mind, and also known as houserule in case of strange or stupid RAW.
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RHat

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« Reply #77 on: (06:30:50/04-30-13) »
So, in other words, precisely what I suggested.
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Elektrycerze3

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« Reply #78 on: (06:39:54/04-30-13) »
OK, Zdravyiy Smyisl it is  :)
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Mithlas

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« Reply #79 on: (12:01:05/04-30-13) »
in part because as an archer you don't carry a shield.  (Nor, really, were shields big things in Japan, so far as I can discover.)
Not nearly as much as it was in Greek-influenced Europe, or the variety of shields used by Scandanavian peoples, or the occasional shields used by Persian-influenced peoples. The peasant conscripts often used shields, but when you're up against samurai cavalry and archers and your warlord has given you a spear and possibly a helm but not armor, you have very strong inclination to lash together some bamboo to make yourself a shield. I find more military historical evidence for this in China where they moved up to metal more often, but there are signs of it being done in Japan as well.

uuh, not so much, the hilt of a Katana is smooth and without large cumbersome weights (Which I have learned will cut up your wrists quite painfully)
It's not a matter of things on the grip getting in the way. As Mirikon said, the katana better fits in the "hand and a half" category, meaning it can be used easily in two hands, or with training can be used in one hand. The heft and balance of the weapon are simply easier to direct with precision when you're using it two-handed, but if you've put in years (or months of intense) training then it's possible to use it one-handed. Again, I think that the Maneuver idea deals with this easily, with no additional rules fudging necessary.

Gesunder MenschenVerstand. German for common sense, literal translation: healthy human mind, and also known as houserule in case of strange or stupid RAW.
That explains a few things from past forum posts I've read. Thanks for pointing out the translation.

Aryeonos

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« Reply #80 on: (15:24:08/04-30-13) »
I can see your point, but I was pointing out that Katanas or any other similarly smooth gripped blade would not impede a one handed swing like many european swords would.

Though, I would state for rules purposes I would take the rule in arsenal as an overwriting rule with a criteria in it for reach 0-1 weapons, which the katana falls under, which though being two handed still also falls under an umbrella rule.

Side note, archers did use shields in europe, and so did crossbowmen, though sometimes they were very small and supported by a simple cord. The shields archers had effectively made them very small emplacements, so they could restring in relative safety, they would also usually have a serf (or something like that) in tow, to carry their shield and arrows.

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and the smaller shield I can't seem to find at the moment, but spearmen also used them.
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JoeNapalm

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« Reply #81 on: (16:43:31/04-30-13) »

Side note, archers did use shields in europe, and so did crossbowmen, though sometimes they were very small and supported by a simple cord. The shields archers had effectively made them very small emplacements, so they could restring in relative safety, they would also usually have a serf (or something like that) in tow, to carry their shield and arrows.

the Pavise
and the smaller shield I can't seem to find at the moment, but spearmen also used them.

Europe, yes, but Japan, not so much.

In the Pre-Samurai era, there was some shield use in Japan, but it died out fairly early.

The Japanese arsenal heavily favored two-handed weapons, and survival wasn't necessarily as a high priority as you might think.

A Samurai, as a mounted archer and two-handed swordsman (who steered with their knees, by the way, not with the reigns in their off-hand, as has been suggested), wouldn't have a use for a shield, and wouldn't have been caught dead cowering behind one, anyway.

Blades for use while mounted would have been the Tachi, or Odachi / Nodachi. In later periods, as Samurai moved away from the traditional mounted combat, they transitioned to the katana, which was worn edge-upward through the belt (not suitable for mounted warfare, but better for quick-draw Iai-jutsu action and CQB).

Infantry favored polearms (gotta love those naginatas).

What shields they did have mostly consisted of tower shields, I believe, for levy infantry to hunker behind when necessary. (Honor-less peasants!)

Oh, and the Ninja sometimes used bucklers. (Pesky Ninja!)


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Aryeonos

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« Reply #82 on: (17:06:44/04-30-13) »
Though there is a strong misconception today as to what samurai considered honorable, samurai were indeed afraid to die, but less so than to be found dishonorable and killed, and have their families shamed. In combat they would use any means necessary to win, and samurai would employ things like shuriken as distractions and other tools or weapons we commonly identify as ninja weapons, whom the samurai were in some cases ninja themselves.

Though armour was very finely crafted and often ornate in japan, the proliferation of it was about the same as any other country in europe, there were those who had bits and pieces of armour, usually for their sword arm, but wore little else and many who wore only normal clothing. For them, the Yari and the Naginata were quite common tools, though the Naginata is often associated with women, it was seen in many other peoples hands.
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JoeNapalm

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« Reply #83 on: (17:39:28/04-30-13) »
From Hagakure:
Quote
Bushidó, I have found out, lies in dying.

When confronted with two alternatives, life and death, one is to choose death without hesitation. There is nothing particularly difficult; one has only to be resolved and push forward.

While some say, "Death without gaining one's end is but a futile death," such a calculating way of thinking comes from conceited, citified bushidó. Pressed between two alternatives, one can hardly be sure of choosing the righteous of the two. To be sure, everybody prefers life to death; he tends to reason himself into staying alive somehow. But if he comes out alive without gaining his righteous end, he is a coward. Therein lies a crucial point to consider.

Conversely, as long as one's choice is death, even if he died without accomplishing his just aim,  his death is free of disgrace, although others may term it as a vain or insane one. This is the essence of bushidó. If one, through being prepared for death every morning and evening, expects death at any moment, bushidó will become his own, whereby he shall be able to serve the lord all his life through and through without blunder.


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Aryeonos

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« Reply #84 on: (18:02:35/04-30-13) »
And here's why Buddhism caught on big time in Japan, there's reincarnation in it. Shinto, not so much, there's an afterlife; where you lay dead in a pit for all of eternity, with everyone else dead, and you're still decaying as normal, only conscious of it.

Shinto shrines make their money from weddings
Buddhist temples make their money from funerals

go figure.
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Kiirnodel

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« Reply #85 on: (11:01:30/05-06-13) »
There is actually a saying:

Japanese are born Shinto, live Christian, and die Buddhist.

  • Shinto is a philosophy regarding life and living.
  • Christianity has many holidays and (for the most part) is a "fun/popular" thing for the Japanese to follow/emulate.
  • Buddhism gives a feeling of security in death and eases the transition.

Aryeonos

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« Reply #86 on: (16:34:38/05-06-13) »
When I was in tokyo, some 5 years ago, I only ever recall seeing maybe 1 church. Though western influence was absolutely everywhere, actual christian iconography was rather rare. But I'm sure they enjoy the holidays, and I rather enjoy some of the hilariously misguided holiday items that emerge from it all.
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