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Im really struggling as a newb with SR6

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MercilessMing

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« Reply #15 on: <06-13-22/1137:54> »
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I just feel that something to reinvent or readdress this game/setting is needed.  While old school players may be able to keep up with the 6 editions of lore, it's all just too much to expect someone walking in new to grab ahold of, either as a GM or player.  Especially these days.  While some can, it limits your audience to those who can.
I felt like this too when I was following the run up to SR6 in 2019.  Now though, I imagine they can't afford to reset the timeline or something similar, because it's their #1 draw.  They could take a page from Cyberpunk RED and do a time jump instead, giving them the space needed to create new lore that influences the new setting.
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SR6 does really feel like it was made for people who already knew the game and the world, so explanations could be handwaved, and cramming complex ideas like Enchanting, Alchemy, Initiation, and Technomancers into the same 300 page count as everything else seemed fine because we all knew what it meant anyway.  It was more of a rules conversion book than a welcome to Shadowrun book in how it turned out.
I feel that way too.  Very much written for people who already knew what this game is about.  Anarchy was the same way, written very much with the assumption that the reader is familiar with SR 5e.  I'm not sure now that they are capable of writing a welcome to Shadowrun book.  They save time (and thus money) using a copy/paste of the previous edition to write the new one, even though it gets them in trouble. 
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Something that can draw in new players as it's primary objective, using a simple but expandable system (no gimmicks like Limits, Edge points, Amps, etc.) and a format that really sets up the GM to create solid basic missions.
  An expandable system is complexity you can opt into.  Amps are an example of that kind of design.  Limits are not, because it's part of the core test resolution.  6e Edge almost was.  AR/DR's hook into the Edge system made it a part of the core test resolution.  You can ignore Edge for a learning game or two, but you have to incorporate it.  Shadowrun hacking is a example of frontloaded complexity.  Even with 6e's streamlining, the price of admission is still a pile of homework for new hacker players - doubled, if they want to play a technomancer.  Shadowrun magic is complexity you can opt into.  Choose an aspected magician to limit how much magic stuff you have to learn.  Spellcasters have limited 'powers' because they know limited spells, and this is expandable by learning new ones.  Later, they can opt into Initiation stuff.  Conjuring is the opposite, in 6e you can summon any type of spirit at any time.  Big menus are an example of frontloaded complexity, but here it's tempered by the fact that there aren't a whole lot of spirit types (though the list will keep growing), the mechanics for calling them are all the same, and because spirits have an enormous range of powers, so you can usually fall back to calling the 1-2 spirits you're used to.



Typhus

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« Reply #16 on: <06-13-22/1933:38> »
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Now though, I imagine they can't afford to reset the timeline or something similar, because it's their #1 draw.

I think it could work if your frame is as a new game.  "Shadowrun: Reborn" or something.

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They could take a page from Cyberpunk RED and do a time jump instead, giving them the space needed to create new lore that influences the new setting.

Seeing the future stabilized would help.  Then it could be more like the first edition where even though the world had changed it was not as chaotic.  Another Matrix crash that takes with it the world's history could help.  Then no one knows the truth, but everyone has a theory. 

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I'm not sure now that they are capable of writing a welcome to Shadowrun book.

It would be a notable time investment, and need some good quality work, true.  I share your skepticism there. 

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An expandable system is complexity you can opt into.

Exactly.  All that.  CP Red is a good example of a legacy game that did that.  Maybe even went a little too basic in some areas, but it's easy to play, easy to teach, and you can   easily add your own content.  The book hints at and teases a lot of different aspects, but they put a LOT of fluff into it.  Very flavorful and full of seeds, and random jobs.  Lots of motivation right right from the gate.  Good interactivity with the fans too.