NEWS

Creating a hacker

  • 42 Replies
  • 17300 Views

Chaemera

  • *
  • Omae
  • ***
  • Posts: 797
  • I may be a mouse, but I have a chainsaw.
« Reply #30 on: <11-27-10/2013:31> »
I don't get the attraction to the Full Immersion Lifestyle.  It just makes things harder on your team and, without a decent background, you looking like a lazy mooch.  For me, it would just take some of the fun out of it anyway.  Cracking a system while bullets ping off the walls and your team bogs down CorpSec always seemed like half the attraction for playing a hacker to me.

Not to mention the kinda heavy-handed advice they give GM's about secure facilities: protect the critical systems by separating them from the wider matrix, thus denying the ability for anyone to connect without being physically present. Not that I object to that advice, it's common sense and standard security for anything involving state/corporate secrets.

Well, physically present means someone has to be physically present. If its the hacker, its simple. Otherwise someone else has to link in and (probably with a sat link) fight their way through any sort of ECM to be a conduit node for the 'Runner. Decker-In-A-Box isn't a new concept but in 2072 the corps are ready for it.

If I'm going to take the time and have a facility that is isolated from the matrix, I'm going to make sure the walls absorb any satellite uplink. They're gonna need to find a way to physically jack in, then uncoil a fi-op line out into the less secure area and hook up the satellite uplink there. Or bring a hell of a lot of toasters to string out the door. . .
SR20A Limited Edition # 124
Obsidian Portal Profile: http://www.obsidianportal.com/profile/chaemera

Nomad Zophiel

  • *
  • Omae
  • ***
  • Posts: 414
  • Zophiel by name. Nomad by profession.
« Reply #31 on: <11-27-10/2043:46> »
I can see lots of borderline situations. To take some modern examples, Langley and Fort Meade (CIA and NSA respectively) most likely have areas that are exactly as you describe. Basically the computers exists in a giant Faraday cage to keep signals on the correct side. Nothing in or out unless you bring a thumb drive. On the other end there are many fairly unimportant computers on wireless networks or the Internet that can be accessed from basically anywhere. There's a large middle ground, though. I'd like to think that my local hospital doesn't have my records on an Intenret accessible computer (they probably do, but play along for the example). On the other hand, they probably trust the security staff to keep people out and aren't too worried about someone with a tetherable cell phone breaking in and opening a pipe to the 'net.

Having said that, the idea of Usda and CI running down a hall full of security trying to unspool an extension cord is pretty funny.

Chaemera

  • *
  • Omae
  • ***
  • Posts: 797
  • I may be a mouse, but I have a chainsaw.
« Reply #32 on: <11-28-10/0025:47> »
Having said that, the idea of Usda and CI running down a hall full of security trying to unspool an extension cord is pretty funny.

Isn't it just the funniest?

I can honestly say, having worked in some of the "secure" environments for engineering work, if it's cheap enough and doesn't require a lot of maintenance (a couple layers of lead paint would kill most commlink signal ratings), they'll install it for anything worth over about 10k (modern US currency, translate as you see fit). If it's worth a million or more, they'll take it a few steps farther. If a government is involved, then they'll do exactly what they are contractually obligated to do, and not a dime more. After all, if they meet the contracted security requirements, damages from things that security didn't prevent are 100% insurance money.
SR20A Limited Edition # 124
Obsidian Portal Profile: http://www.obsidianportal.com/profile/chaemera

Kot

  • *
  • Ace Runner
  • ****
  • Posts: 1675
  • Meaow
« Reply #33 on: <11-28-10/0801:02> »
And remember, that Corporations are a lot more paranoid and far-sighted than any government. It's their own money, not taxpayers.
Mariusz "Kot" Butrykowski
"Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons for you are crunchy and good with ketchup."

Nomad Zophiel

  • *
  • Omae
  • ***
  • Posts: 414
  • Zophiel by name. Nomad by profession.
« Reply #34 on: <11-28-10/1705:29> »
And remember, that Corporations are a lot more paranoid and far-sighted than any government. It's their own money, not taxpayers.

Or corporations only care about the quarterly report and will happily slaughter their own long term prospects to make sure the Board gets that extra bonus. I pretty much go with the "security is the minimum necessary to get insurance to cover losses" for anything with a value of less than priceless or unique.

Kot

  • *
  • Ace Runner
  • ****
  • Posts: 1675
  • Meaow
« Reply #35 on: <11-29-10/0909:07> »
You forget about the middle corp caste, whose lives depend on those 'disposable' projects. They will do whatever it gets, to both keep their job, and get it done. They're a lot more ambitious than the high-ups, because there's more for them to gain...
An ambitious Security Chief will make his facility as impervious to intrusion, as it gets, whatever means neccesary...
A Spider will use his contats and illegally beef up his facility's home network.
A Corporate Mage will use his own resources to keep intruders at bay, not only what the corp approves.
All of them get scolded, if they succeed. Then they get 'demoted' to another post... But surprisingly one with more perspectives and better paycheck. The corp in question might officialy not approve their methods, but it will reward their success.
« Last Edit: <11-29-10/0919:04> by Kot »
Mariusz "Kot" Butrykowski
"Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons for you are crunchy and good with ketchup."

etherial

  • *
  • Newb
  • *
  • Posts: 61
« Reply #36 on: <11-29-10/0919:49> »
To take some modern examples, Langley and Fort Meade (CIA and NSA respectively) most likely have areas that are exactly as you describe. Basically the computers exists in a giant Faraday cage to keep signals on the correct side. Nothing in or out unless you bring a thumb drive.

Thumb drives in Langley? You're funny.

Nomad Zophiel

  • *
  • Omae
  • ***
  • Posts: 414
  • Zophiel by name. Nomad by profession.
« Reply #37 on: <11-29-10/1615:58> »
Hey, it worked for Tom Cruise!  ;D

FastJack

  • *
  • Administrator
  • Prime Runner
  • *****
  • Posts: 6187
  • Kids these days...
« Reply #38 on: <11-29-10/1641:26> »
It also is working quite well for WikiLeaks...

Dead Monky

  • *
  • Omae
  • ***
  • Posts: 746
  • I demand tacos!
« Reply #39 on: <11-29-10/1644:04> »
Don't forget your wi-fi inhibiting wallet: http://www.skymall.com/shopping/detail.htm?pid=203265750&c=10940

FastJack

  • *
  • Administrator
  • Prime Runner
  • *****
  • Posts: 6187
  • Kids these days...
« Reply #40 on: <11-29-10/1650:00> »
Don't forget your wi-fi inhibiting wallet: http://www.skymall.com/shopping/detail.htm?pid=203265750&c=10940
That's something I'd actually consider buying, especially as Convention time approaches.

Dead Monky

  • *
  • Omae
  • ***
  • Posts: 746
  • I demand tacos!
« Reply #41 on: <11-29-10/1706:49> »

Kot

  • *
  • Ace Runner
  • ****
  • Posts: 1675
  • Meaow
« Reply #42 on: <11-29-10/1740:50> »
I'd rather keep of the crowds, and stay frosty. :P
Mariusz "Kot" Butrykowski
"Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons for you are crunchy and good with ketchup."